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Pesto Omelette

    pesto omelette served on a plate

    Pesto tastes good on everything—even omelettes! This pesto omelette recipe calls for making a delicious, creamy pesto to spread on a simple omelette for an herby, delicious meal you’ll want to make over and over again.

    Lightened with a few ingredient substitutions, using just a food processor, you can whip this pesto together almost as quickly as the eggs. Because this makes a lot of pesto, it is a great dish to make when you need to feed your family—and even more so when you have a few people over you want to impress! 

    Herby and fresh, this dish is so flavorful that you will want to pair it with something light.  Try a few pieces of toast or a few sections of an orange. Have it with lemon water or light tea. Keep the pairings simple to allow the pesto to really shine (because it will!).

    I like to create a fairly smooth paste with my pesto. I run my food processor for a while and will drizzle olive oil into the pesto until I get the consistency I want. If you prefer it to be a little chunkier than mine, you can start by pulsing your food processor rather than running it continuously for a really chunky product, or run the processor for less time. 

    What You Need to Make a Pesto Omelette

    You will need large eggs, fresh basil, feta, parmesan, salt, pepper, olive oil, and pistachios.

    Fresh basil can be hard to find year-round, depending on where you live. I have also experimented with using some fresh spinach and a few teaspoons of dried basil when I haven’t been able to find enough fresh. 

    ingredients to make pesto omelette

     Ingredients: 

    • Large eggs
    • Fresh basil
    • Feta
    • Parmesan
    • Salt
    • Pepper
    • Olive oil
    • Pistachios

    Equipment: 

    This recipe requires a nonstick frying pan, a bowl, a whisk, a spatula, a cutting board, a knife, a cheese grater, and a food processor.

    I like to chop up my soft cheese in this recipe and use a cheese grater to create thin parmesan chips so that both kinds of cheese incorporate well into the pesto. However, you can use a vegetable peeler to make long strips of parmesan if you have that instead.

    How To Make a Pesto Omelette

    Prepare the pesto: Place the basil, nuts, cheese, salt, and ground pepper in a food processor, and run until smooth. While the machine is running, slowly drizzle the olive oil into the machine until it forms a spreadable paste.

    Make sure to taste it as you go. Depending on how salty your cheese is, you may want to add more salt. 

    finished pesto

    Prepare the eggs: Whisk the eggs until frothy.

    Make the omelette: Heat a small frying pan on medium heat. Pour the eggs into a prepared pan. Allow to cook for 4-5 minutes or until the eggs have set.

    Add several generous tablespoons of pesto to one side of the omelette and flip over the other side. 

    assemble pesto omelette

    Enjoy: Remove the omelette from the pan and enjoy!

    pesto omelette served on plate

    Recipe FAQs

    Can I make any changes to make the pesto more like a traditional one?

    In traditional pesto, you typically will not find feta or pistachios, and instead all parmesan and pine nuts. However, I really like the flavor and texture that you get from the feta. Pistachios are also a lot easier to find than pine nuts and offer a bright flavor that I like. 

    If you were to substitute something in this pesto, I would recommend going back to the traditional pine nuts but leaving the feta. Its creamy, tangy flavor and texture are a nice addition to the eggs.

    Can I make this in advance?

    Omelettes are best eaten while they are hot. I do not recommend trying to reheat an already-cooked omelette. 

    What can I do with the extra pesto?

    This recipe only makes one omelette, but it makes a lot of pesto. You can make more omelettes, or put the pesto on sandwiches or on pasta for meals later in the week. It also freezes well, so you can save it for later. 

    pesto omelette served on a plate

    Pesto Omelette

    Arielle Hess
    A delicious twist on a regular omelette, this pesto omelette is an herby, delicious meal for a brunch with your family. Light and fresh, the star of this omelette is the feta pesto that melts beautifully into the warm eggs.
    No ratings yet
    Prep Time 10 mins
    Cook Time 5 mins
    Total Time 15 mins
    Course Breakfast
    Servings 1
    Calories 359 kcal

    Ingredients
      

    • 3 large eggs
    • 2 cups fresh basil
    • cup roasted pistachios
    • 4 oz feta cheese
    • 1 oz parmesan
    • ½ teaspoon table salt
    • 1 teaspoon ground pepper
    • 1/2 cup olive oil

    Instructions
     

    • Place 2 cups fresh basil, ⅓ cup roasted pistachios, 4 oz feta cheese, 1 oz parmesan, ½ teaspoon table salt, and 1 teaspoon ground pepper in a food processor.
    • While running drizzle olive oil into the mixture until a spreadable paste forms.
    • Whisk 3 large eggs until frothy in a bowl
    • Heat a small frying pan on medium heat with a little olive oil.
    • Pour the eggs into a prepared pan. Allow to cook for 4-5 minutes or until the eggs have set.
    • Spread 2-3 heaping tablespoons of the pesto over the eggs.
    • Fold half of the omelette over itself.
    • Remove from the pan and enjoy!

    Notes

    If you prefer your pesto to be a little chunkier than mine, you can start by pulsing your food processor rather than running it continuously.
    If you were to substitute something in this pesto, I would recommend going back to the traditional pine nuts but leaving the feta.
    This recipe only makes one omelette, but it makes a lot of pesto. You can make more omelettes, or put the pesto on sandwiches or on pasta for meals later in the week.

    Nutrition

    Calories: 359kcalCarbohydrates: 5.42gProtein: 8.586gFat: 34.48gSaturated Fat: 8.67gFiber: 1.1gSugar: 2.1g
    Keyword eggs, omelette, pesto
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    Arielle is a food and drink photographer based in Washington, D.C. She was previously a social science researcher before she fell in love with photography.

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